1-28-11: Fire in the Wind

January 28, 2011 at 8:27 am 2 comments

What will the world be like after global warming? Or rather, in the midst of it? That’s the question that legislator and now novelist Dana Stein asks in his first novel, Fire in the Wind. He joins Sheilah today to talk about it.

Dana Stein will be speaking about Fire in the Wind and signing copies at the Borders Express on Democracy Boulevard in Bethesda after the General Assembly session wraps up:  Saturday, April 16, from 1 to 3 pm.

Entry filed under: Energy, Environment, On Air. Tags: , , .

1-28-11: AVAM Makes Us Laugh 1-28-11: Yes, We Need No New Nurses

2 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Diogenes  |  January 28, 2011 at 9:02 am

    Quote:
    Scientists are in broad agreement that the earth has been slowly warming for about three centuries. We don’t know why, which should give us a clue about the depth of our understanding of the climate.

    More to the point, there is no agreement about such basic, rudimentary, fundamental, all-important questions as the sign and size of the cloud feedbacks. A change of 2% in cloud cover would wipe out any CO2 effect. Since we don’t understand the clouds, that most basic and critically important part of climate science, the idea that we understand why the earth is currently warming, or the idea that we can forecast climate a hundred years in advance, is hubris of the first order. We don’t know why it warmed in Medieval times. We don’t know why it warmed in Roman times. We don’t know why it has warmed since the “Little Ice Age”. We don’t understand the climate, and you folks’ claims that you do understand it well enough to make century-long forecasts just makes rational, reasonable people point and laugh.

    -Willis Eschenbach

    Reply
  • 2. Diogenes  |  January 28, 2011 at 9:12 am

    “However, at the heart of the IPCC is a cadre of scientists whose careers have been made by the IPCC. These scientists have used the IPCC to jump the normal meritocracy process by which scientists achieve influence over the politics of science and policy. Not only has this brought some relatively unknown, inexperienced and possibly dubious people into positions of influence, but these people become vested in protecting the IPCC, which has become central to their own career and legitimizes playing power politics with their expertise.”

    -Judith A. Curry, Ph.D.
    Professor & Chair, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
    Georgia Institute of Technology
    Ph.D., Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, 1982
    NASA Advisory Council Earth Science Subcommittee
    Fellow, American Meteorologic Society
    Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science
    Fellow, American Geophysical Union.

    Reply

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